Cabinet of Natural Philosophy - Page 1 - Photos of the moment

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THE ELEMENTS OF MECHANICS,
CHAP, 1.
PROPERTIES OF MATTER — MAGNITUDE — IMPENETRA-
—FIGURE-—FORCE.
(1 e) PLACED in the material world, Man is continually
exposed to the action of an infinite variety of objects by
which he is surrounded. The body, to which the think-
ing and living principles have been united, is an ap-
paratus exquisitely contrived to receive and to transmit
Its various parts are organised with
these impressions.
obvious reference to the several external agents by which
it is to be affected. Each organ is designed to convey
to the mind immediate notice of some peculiar action,
and is accordingly endued with a corresponding suscep-
tibility. This adaptation of the organs of sense to the
particular influences of material agents, is rendered still
more conspicuous when we consider that, however de-
licate its structure, each organ is wholly insensible to
every influence except that to which it appears to
specially appropriated. The eye, so intensely susceptible
imp.ressions from light, is not at all affected by those
sound ; while the fine mechanism of the ear, so sen-
sitively alive to every effect of the latter class, is alto-
gether insensible to the former. The splendour of ex-
cessive light may occasion blindness, and deafness may
result from the roar of a cannonade; but neither the
Eight nor the hearing can be injured by the most ex-

PROPERTIES OF MATTER — MAGNITUDE — IMPENETRABILITY
In the Public Domain - from an edition of a book published in 1839
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